Guide to getting a job marking exams from home

Becoming an examiner for an examination board is a useful source of extra income. In addition to this, it improves your own teaching practice, giving you extra knowledge and understanding to share with your pupils and colleagues.

By improving your understanding and application of the assessment requirements of a particular examination board, you can improve your own assessment practice and teaching objectives. Teachers who have marked examinations in their subject areas speak highly of the the extra insight they get into the exact skills required to do well in the various papers and how it has an extremely positive impact on the way they teach.

To become an examiner, you need to have current or recent experience in the subject you will be marking. You also need to have a teaching qualification or QTS and a high-level of subject expertise in the your specialist field.

The best way to secure a job as an examiner is to apply directly to the examination board. Many posts will already have been filled, but there are some subject areas for which markers are still required.

Here is a list of the main examination boards to contact:

GCSE and A level

https://www.aqa.org.uk/about-us/become-an-examiner-or-moderator/examiner-vacancies

https://www.ocr.org.uk/about/examiners-and-assessors

https://www.eduqas.co.uk/examiners-and-moderators/vacancies-for-examiners-and-moderators/

https://www.wjec.co.uk/appointees/examiner-moderator-vacancies/

Key Stage 2 Tests

https://qualifications.pearson.com/en/support/support-for-you/teachers/work-with-us.html

Technical Qualifications

https://www.cityandguilds.com/delivering-our-qualifications/exams-and-admin/examiner-vacancies

 

Tutor Time Quiz 1-5 October 2018

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1. Who thinks they can do a better job of Brexit than Theresa May?
2. What name has been given to the beluga whale swimming in the Thames?
3. Which manager and football player were caught arguing on TV?
4. How tall was the tsunami that hit the Indonesian island of Sulawesi?
5. What is Theresa May planning for 2022?
6. What did a kayaker get slapped in the face with last week?
7. How many days did 18 year-old Aldi Adilang survive for on a drifting fishing hut in the Pacific Ocean?
8. What was Bristol University cleaner, Herman Gordon, given as a gift from students?
9. What has Kanye West changed his stage name to?
10. What surprising reason was given for a London train being delayed last week?

This week’s debate. Should Theresa May stick to the Chequers deal?

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YES

1. This deal, a plan for how the UK will leave the EU, was decided by May and her cabinet. Therefore, May has a duty to stick to it.

2. Free trade in the EU (no taxes on goods entering or leaving the UK) would benefit the UK and the EU.

3.When the majority of British people voted to leave the EU, they expected more control over immigration, so May must stick to additional checks at UK borders.

NO

1. We must work with our EU counterparts to come up with a deal that suits everyone even if this means changing some of the Chequers deal.

2. If there is no deal, the Bank of England has said that this could lead to job losses and businesses worry that it would make trade with other countries difficult.

3. The deal was put together by the Cabinet and not agreed in Parliament.

 

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Should we stay or should we go? The snowy trek to work.

The recent inclement weather has meant sledging heaven for children but decision-making hell for adults.

Headteachers are faced with the catch-22 situation of opening to meet the needs of teaching requirements and working parents or closing to ensure everyone’s saftey and avoid accidents.

As someone involved with schools, you have, most likely, had to face your own difficult decisions this week, Do I risk a treacherous journey, so that I don’t let my colleagues down, or should I be sensible and avoid travelling? That is a question which has, undoubtedly, been on the minds of many this week and I am sure we all agree that the drip-drip of the thaw outside is a welcome sound!

The BBC have published an interesting article which gives some insight into the impact of snow closures on schools:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-21119186

Why supply teaching could be the right path for you.

Whether you are completely new to the teaching profession or have perhaps been teaching for several, or even, many years now, the flexibility offered by supply teaching is something worth considering.

Your life situation may mean that the hours of work which are normally required of a classroom teacher are simply not practical. For example, if you have young children at school, you may be looking for work which allows you to drop them off and pick them up. Supply teaching could be a way of balancing your teaching career with your family.